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Gun Control Essay

CREATING A REFLECTIVE PAPER OUTLINE AND A CORRESPONDING REFLECTION ESSAY

❶At first, I had no idea what the heck an essay outline was, so my teacher gave us a link to this awesome website and I then learned how to do an essay outline.

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UNDERSTANDING WHAT A REFLECTIVE ESSAY IS AND LEARNING HOW TO START A REFLECTION PAPER
Essay Outline
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Then draw three or more lines extending from the circle. At the end of each of the lines you have drawn, write down a new idea that corresponds to your main idea. Then draw three or more lines from each of those new ideas, and write ideas that corresponds to those ideas.

Continue developing your cluster until you feel that you have explored as many connections as you can. Respond to each questions in as much detail as you can. This exercise will help develop your ideas and identify areas of your topic that you need to learn more about. Ask yourself what you want to accomplish with your paper.

Are you writing this paper in order to persuade, entertain, enlighten, or something else? Just make sure that your purpose is in line with what the assignment asks you to do. Look for keywords in the assignment guidelines to help you figure out what your purpose should be. Think about who will read your paper.

Identify the needs and expectations of your audience by considering what they do and do not know about your topic. Anticipate their reactions as well. How they might react to the information that you will be sharing with them?

Will they be angry, sad, amused, or something else? Once you have developed your ideas and considered your purpose and audience, you should be ready to write a thesis statement. A thesis should not be more than one sentence in length. Do not state facts or matters of taste. For example, something like "George Washington was the first president of the United States," would not be a good thesis because it states a fact.

Likewise, "Die Hard is a great movie," would not work because it expresses a matter of taste. In other words, avoid simply saying that something is "good" or "effective" and say what specifically makes it "good" or "effective. Choose a standard alphanumeric structure for an easy outline structure. An alphanumeric outline is the most common, easily recognized outline type, and each subdivision is identified by Roman numerals, capitalized letters, Arabic numerals, and lowercase letters, in that order.

You will typically have three for an essay outline: Choose a decimal outline structure to show how your ideas are related. A decimal outline is similar in structure to an alphanumeric outline, but it only uses a series of numbers to identify each subsection. Some people prefer this structure because it shows how each section contributes to the essay as a whole. Therefore, the first section would read "1. For instance, under the "1. Further subsections can be added by adding another decimal, followed by a number that corresponds to the new information.

For instance, under the first "1. Determine whether to use full sentences or brief phrases in your outline. For most outline essays, full sentences will prove more useful because they allow you to provide more thorough information.

Use parallel structures for outline sections. For example, if one section of your outline begins with a verb that uses the present tense, then the next section should also begin with a verb that uses present tense. Coordinate section titles and subordinate subsections. Each section title should feature information that is equally important to other section titles and subsections should contain information that is less important than your main section titles.

These outline section titles feature information that is as important as the first section title. Divide each heading into two or more parts. In order to provide adequate information for each section, you will need to divide each section into two or more parts. Provide your introduction in the first section of your outline. This section should include an attention getting opening and general information about your topic.

The information you provide in your introduction outline should gradually become more specific as you progress through its subsections. A shocking fact or anecdote is a great way to start.

Keep this section brief, but include the information that your readers will need to know in order to understand your paper. State the idea or argument that you plan to discuss in your essay. Provide essay body information in the second section of your outline.

The body of your essay should be the largest part of your essay, so you will want to devote at least three subsections to this portion of your outline. Do not label each point as "main point. Under each main point, you should write supporting evidence to back the point up. Give each piece of supporting evidence its own line and sub-section. Then, write out an explanation analyzing the evidence and showing how it supports your claims.

If desired, you could also include a sentence that transitions into your next major point at the end of each "main idea" section. This is not strictly necessary, though. Provide your conclusion information in the last section of your essay outline. This section should return the reader to the general discussion brought up in the "introduction" portion. Restate your thesis first. Do not copy your original thesis statement word-for-word.

Instead, restate the idea, but rephrase it in a new way. Make a concluding statement. A concluding statement will usually discuss the implications of the thesis, propose solutions to problems addressed in the essay, or explain the importance of the thesis to something outside of the range of the essay.

Check your work against your assignment sheet, if applicable. Outlines are a great way to organize your ideas! They help you plan out your ideas and research prior to writing your final paper.

Write down everything you might include in your outline. You can always eliminate ideas later! Here are some ways to organize your thoughts: Create a mind map. Write your thoughts on index cards. Develop a thesis or controlling idea for your outline. In most cases, this will be the thesis you use to complete the final product, such as an essay.

For example, you may be writing a paper about policy change. Write an alphanumeric outline for the easy approach. Although you might not recognize the name, most outlines follow the alphanumeric format. Each level of your outline will be organized using a letter or number.

Make a decimal outline to highlight the relationship between ideas. A decimal outline looks very similar to an alphanumeric outline. However, a decimal outline only uses numbers, and each sublevel is set off with decimals. This allows you to illustrate that each sublevel is a part of a larger argument. Decide if you want to write full sentences or short phrases. Most outlines include short phrases, which are also called topic outlines. However, using full sentences can help you better understand your ideas.

You might use full sentences to make it easier to write a final paper, to make a good study guide, or to fulfill the requirements of an assignment. Group your ideas together. Review your brainstorming, placing related ideas in the same group. You can always eliminate ideas you realize are unnecessary. These groups will become main points, so narrow your groups down until you have your desired number of main points.

For an essay or speech, that often means 3, but a creative piece may have more. Sort your index cards, if you used them to brainstorm. Put cards with related ideas together. For example, you can put them in stacks, or you can line your cards out in rows to make them easier to read.

Put each group in order from broad ideas to specific details. Broad ideas are more likely to be your main points, while details are the bits of information you will use to support those ideas.

Depending on the purpose of your outline, you may have many subpoints and supporting details. However, aim to have at least subpoints and supporting details for each main idea. Your subpoints might be that Victor Frankenstein is restored by nature and that his scientific efforts create a monster. As supporting details, you might include quotes from the book. For an essay or speech, pick the subtopic with the most supporting materials, and lead with this argument. From there, order your major subtopics so each one naturally flows into the next.

Outline your introduction as the first main point for a speech or essay. You can use either phrases or full sentences, depending on which you chose to use. Some people prefer to write out their introduction, which is also okay. Here are the points you need in your introduction: The outline headings are your main points. These ideas should be drawn directly from your thesis or controlling idea. Frankenstein champions emotion over reason Full sentence outline: In Frankenstein , Mary Shelley champions the use of emotion over reason.

Write at least 2 subpoints for each main idea. These are the ideas that further explain your main point. In an essay, they might be your reasons for making your argument.

In a creative work, they might be parts of your plot point. For example, a novel may have many subpoints. Similarly, a study guide will likely have several subpoints, as well. Add at least 2 supporting details for each subpoint. They might include direct quotes, statistics, facts, or examples. For a creative work, you might include essential details you must include in that scene, such as an internal conflict in your main character.

Similar to subpoints, you may have more supporting details, depending on your purpose. A novel or study guide will likely have more supporting details. Include more layers of your outline, if necessary. Most basic outlines will include 3 layers, but you may need more. If this is the case, you can continue creating sublevels using the formatting structure you chose, either alphanumeric or decimal. For example, you might need more layers to provide more details. In the Frankenstein example above, you might include a 4th layer to write out your commentary about the quotes you used to support your point.

Your subpoints might include the following: Write a concluding statement. Your outline should relate back to your thesis or main idea, address the purpose you set out to achieve and reflect your audience.

Revise your outline if ideas are missing or not fleshed out. In some cases, you may need to add more information, such as additional supporting details. The revision process allows you to do that. You might also want to rewrite sentences or phrases to make your ideas clearer.

Check for typos, grammatical errors, and formatting flaws. This will ensure you get full credit for your work. If not, go back and correct the areas that are lacking. Add layers if necessary. If you need to add additional sub-layers, use lowercase Roman numerals i, ii, iii, iv, etc. In most cases, three or four layers will be enough.

Try to combine points first before you add a fifth. You might also include additional layers for a long creative work or a detailed study guide. Then, dedicate each body paragraph to one of your claims, as well as the evidence that supports it. Make sure you break down your evidence in your body paragraphs.

Not Helpful 0 Helpful 2. Yes, having an outline will help you familiarize yourself with the process of something. It is your guide for your experiment, whatever kind is it. Having an outline is like planning. Not Helpful 17 Helpful How do I write an outline quickly when I am under time pressure during exams? Begin with reading the exam question quickly but thoroughly. As you read, jot down the major points that occur to you immediately.

Not Helpful 23 Helpful You could plan out your characters and plot as well as different parts, like setting. If you have a theme or moral add that too. It may be hard to write a lot, but take it slow and practice. Not Helpful 15 Helpful The outline is meant to be done as the first step of your paper, outline, etc. It gets your ideas down on paper, gets your mind-wheels turning, without having to deal with all of the fancy and tedious details that come with putting your ideas into complete sentences.

It helps to pour out your mind, organize your research, and structure your final vision before you do the actual writing. It also helps to "road-map" your writing when you get to that step. Not Helpful 11 Helpful Think about whatever you want to write about that happened in your life, and then make an outline in either chronological order or in order of what you think is important, based on your own writing ability.

Not Helpful 16 Helpful

GUN CONTROL PERSUASIVE ESSAY

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An essay outline can even help you determine the length of each paragraph. Especially in cases where you are limited to a number of pages or assigned a word count, you can use an essay outline to break the structure into percentages or words.

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Persuasive Essay Outline. Follow the directions directly. ENG Creating an Outline for an Essay. Persuasive Essay Outline explanation Rules of a five paragraph persuasive essay Introduction sentences Hook: Must be related to your topic.

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Sample Essay Outlines Why Write an Outline? An outline will help you organize your main ideas and determine the order in which you are going to write about them. Writing an outline is a very effective way to think through how you will organize and present the information in your essay. English Composition 1 Creating an Outline for an Essay. Most analytical, interpretive, or persuasive essays tend to follow the same basic pattern. This page should help you formulate effective outlines for most of the essays that you will write. I. Introduction. 1. Sentence to get the attention of your readers.

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Then you’ll get the chance to access some awesome essay outline templates to help you start writing a well-planned and strongly organized paper that wows your professor. Apr 16,  · How to Write an Essay Outline. Essay outlines provide structure and guidance for writers as they begin the drafting process. Check out your school’s writing center for extra help with your outline. Most schools have writing centers that offer walk-in and by appointment help for all kinds of writing projects. Edit Related 79%(24).